Author Archives: PA2S

Between Dusk and Dawn

Our radio friends in New Zealand informed me that the article on 60 metre propagation was published in the NZART magazine “Break-In”. Below, a link to the article as I submitted it. 60_metre_EU_ZL_propagation_PA2S Summary (taken from the longer version of the study) The author, radio amateur, became intrigued by ionospheric propagation during the late 70’s… Continue reading »

60 metres in Australia refused

60 metres in Australia refused

Similar to the recent retraction of the permits in New Zealand, the ACMA decision not to support amateur use of the 60 m band in Australia is a slap in the face. Invalid arguments and even secrecy were brought forward to support the decision. Why is 15 kHz of spectrum with only 15 Watts radiated… Continue reading »

Alpin 100 amplifier high voltage issue

Alpin 100 amplifier high voltage issue

About two weeks ago, my Alpin 100 suddenly failed whilst transmitting. Shutdown with error 52. The manual stated that the high voltage was less than 1500 V or over 3300 V. I tried to restart and immediately went to the HV menu, the voltage was about 2100 V, which was much lower than the expected… Continue reading »

New Zealand 60 m trial licenses expire

New Zealand 60 m trial licenses expire

Today, I received very sad news about expiry of the 60 m trial licenses in New Zealand. On October 24th, the 60 metres band in New Zealand will become silent. I very well remember the first contacts back in January 2018 and at the time, I did not know about the very good propagation between… Continue reading »

Icom IC-7100 stability test

Icom IC-7100 stability test

Not too long ago, a pre-owned Icom IC-7100 was acquired, as a replacement for the IC-706 mk II. Although the 706 is a small, versatile and a “value for money” little devil, it has its habits. On 2 metres, the frequency drift is very annoying and way too excessive for narrowband digital modes. Even in… Continue reading »

Entry level licence?

There were times when there was only one type of amateur radio licence. One had to pass a technical exam and a Morse code test, because telegraphy was the standard operation mode. Later on, a separate licence became available without the Morse test and only gave access to VHF and up. My first exam was… Continue reading »

Visiting F6GYH

Visiting F6GYH

In September, I paid a visit to Bernard, F6GYH. Bernard lives in Fayl-Billot, which is about 15 minutes of driving from my French QTH. His location is excellent for VHF and up, because he has nearly 360 degrees unobstructed sight. Even with a tower of modest height, his antennas have a clear view to the… Continue reading »